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Why does a major corporation come to a consulting firm to lead a software implementation when the software vendor has a whole implementation arm of its own? What’s the value prop for paying the consulting firm?

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Member of a vendor’s implementation arm here: there isn’t one. The firms almost always get in our way and lead to an inferior solution/PMO vs our professional services team.

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Software vendors professional service teams are usually weaker than their alliance partners. Software development and maintenance is the priority, whereas deploying the software is the core focus of the partner firm. Also, the alliance partner firms usually pay more, to significantly more, than the vendor for proserv resources, and thus generally attract better talent in that space. Finally, the partner firms, on the larger end of the scale, have a breadth of other service networks that they can supplement the deployment with - e.g. deploying Workday with service now in parallel, finance transformation, change/training, industry specific advisory groups, etc. When moving to a new system, large enterprise organizations use the technology deployment to transform their enterprise more broadly, which the vendors just don’t have the capability or experience to support.

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When it fails they have someone else to blame

funny

Lots of good reasons...here are a few
1. Lack of internal bandwidth
2. Lack of knowledge of that specific software platform
3. Outside help can be more effective at challenging status quo and/or saying no to things that may lead to scope creep
4. Outside firms will have experience across many similar implementations which they can help draw best practices / avoid pitfalls they have seen elsewhere

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Senior manager 1 vs UKG 1 clearly have different POVs lol. I feel like if I was an industry executive I would want the people who know the product best and will dedicate the most attention to an implementation, as it is their companies product, than a consulting firm who is floating in and out of multiple clients at a time and implementing different softwares etc. I don’t see how the firms are the ones with the “expertise”

Consulting firms don’t pull from the entire firm to staff a project. They pull from the practice that implements the specific system. We have practices that specialize in SAP, Maximo, Infor, Oracle, Workday, etc. so the implementation consultants are very well-versed in the system. Additionally, the software company focuses on creating the software, developing system-wide bug fixes, and such. The consulting firm focuses on understanding the client’s business needs and tailoring the software to fit those needs. Both groups are needed, just at different points

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Hi All,

Anyone who recently selected or joined Accenture. Can you guide from where to download letter of authorization which needs to be signed and upload back.pls reply.
Thanks

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