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What is the role of Change Management on a technical implementation? Like what are the standard CM deliverables? I’ve never had CM on past implementations but MD insists on it for new project and I’m+

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PLEASE reach out to someone in T&O for help and don't put random sht in your action plan! We will hate you when you staff us on a crap plan.

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likeuplifting
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Ask an MD or SM in T&O for help. They will find you someone who's on the bench and can help you put some real details in your work plan.

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Where is your change / human capital expert on the project. Change impact report Change agent network approach Leadership alignment Change activity: road shows, listening tours Communications Training

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Measurement/process/org realignment may also be included

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This really shouldn’t be a FB question...check out ADM and there is plethora of information/very laid out internal frameworks and methodologies

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likeuplifting
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SC2, I'd fight bears to have you on my team. Great advice and tone, you'll go far.

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likeuplifting
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BCG just recently fought bears to hire me. I hope I do right by them :)

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You really need to get the end users and managing stakeholders on the client side to change how they interact with the current solution vs how they will interact with the future one.

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If the MD is insisting on it does he/she have a contact you can tap for help in scoping their role?

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No, I’ve asked multiple times. I’ll try T&O but if they want a WBS the MD may balk

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IMO: create a client experience strategy (deliverable), create RACI, assign requirements that need to be communicated vs. information that does not need to be communicated, create comm content (deliverables), confirm RACI, establish a schedule (deliverable) and execute? But like I’d think you’d have a framework formalized somewhere internally, no?

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So to clarify, there are 13 end users. There isn’t really a lot to communicate since they are part of the process test cycle The deliverables so far are all driven by technology. AMD isn’t helpful because it’s mostly strategy based and isn’t Agile. The project moves too fast and we’ll have a Scrum master handling our daily stand up meetings, not CM. How has CM fit in for other Agile projects?

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So by the time they are testing, you’re a bit late. The lamest thing that can happen is that they suddenly enter test and have a visceral reaction to the newness of the technology. The times when change management can help prevent that are 1) when database cuts over from the old architecture to the new 2) when old functionality is turned down for new functionality (get out ahead of this one and let people know well in advance, then send reminders) 3) start garnering bandwagon for the new functionality in advance (coming soon, you’ll be able to do these great x,y,z things) 4)listen to end user concerns when you do these things and go over them with the tech team. Sometimes we can incorporate their feedback during the sprint development) That’s the vein of thinking. The deliverables can be driven by tech, but they are staged by you. Pretend you are the PR agent for a movie star whose controversial movie is about to release. You have investors in the movie, movie goers, the directors, etc all to schmooze. If the movie is going to be late or if the subject matter is sooooo controversial, you’ll want to get out ahead of it to ease everyone into opening night the way one eases into a hot bath. Otherwise, the release of the movie happens, and people recoil because the reaction to new things is always discomfort before excitement. Your job is to rally excitement, manage around the negatives, and ease people in one sprint at a time with what to expect. By the time the software is released, it should be old hat. Tech doesn’t have time to do all these things—they’re delivering the product.

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@S2 - End user testing starts in week 3 and occurs every 3 weeks through all the sprints. So by the time of the production cutover in week 37, the end users have gone through several iterations of testing Also the technology team collects end user feedback using an online ALM that creates defects and links to reports run bu the technology team. It seems odd to throw in a middleman to gather feedback on a technology. Especially if the middleman isn’t trained on the technology and cannot provide answers. I guess the bandwagon/rallying thing would be good but it’s something that should come around the last sprint, the end users and stakeholders would have already heard the spiel though during every previous sprint.

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Ok sure. So the testers are heavily engaged in testing, and you have an automated way to collect feedback. You’d tally all that feedback and track w the tech team that they’re all getting resolved to satisfaction. Retire those items and communicate back to the end users how you resolved them. You can’t ghost until the issues are resolved—people want to know you’re incorporating their feedback and how you’re doing it. Bandwagon isn’t something that happens towards the end. It usually starts at the halfway point and keeps going even past the end. If there is a production cutover in week 37 you can help make sure the infrastructure for it is available and document the specs around that environment. Your big work is basically around issue resolution and prep for production cutover. Are they turning anything off for it, or is it all just new stuff? You need to socialize when stuff goes down and prep that cutover governance document with the tech lead. Not understanding technology can’t be an excuse—do what you need to do to understand this product. Tech resources are expected to suddenly understand all these business units and functions, so there is a reciprocal expectation on you for technology. You will need to prepare focused questions to ask someone on the tech team regularly so you can mobilize infrastructure on the client side. Cutover can usually be split up into X pieces. Before and after completion of each piece, the internal stakeholders for your firm and client will want a communication. After certain production pieces, the end users should receive a well-curated email stating what happened, what is next, and any action they need to take. Do you see the pattern in the advice I’m giving you? Every time you respond with how your team operates slightly differently, I write back slightly altering what you need to do, but the main idea is the same. All the best.

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Struggling to put them on the action plan. Training usually occurs during the prototype sessions as part of testing and clients are typically involved early on for config so knowledge transfer and training are don’t throughout project, not at the end. Not sure what to assign to CM and when

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Contact a T & O practitioner

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Look up stuff on the KX — but also implementation is only as effective as the change that is managed - otherwise adoption rates suck

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