{ "media_type": "text", "post_content": "Don't get me wrong, I LOVE working form home full time. However, I have noticed I feel less relaxed after work and I think it might be because I don't have that time commuting home to listen to audiobooks and decompress. How do you 'leave work at work' when you have a home office?", "post_id": "626af0ed141ab10033d84868", "reply_count": 57, "vote_count": 45, "bowl_id": "55375ce690f5eebe1d2a0f88", "bowl_name": "Tech", "feed_type": "crowd" }
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Don't get me wrong, I LOVE working form home full time. However, I have noticed I feel less relaxed after work and I think it might be because I don't have that time commuting home to listen to audiobooks and decompress. How do you 'leave work at work' when you have a home office?

likehelpful
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Agreed. I love being in an office, I can cut off work when I leave. The mandate that I have to return and the expectation that I need to be somewhere for 8 hours is the issue.

I would love to come in at 10, 11, whenever. As long as my work gets done, who cares? Especially during the winter months when it's night at 4pm. Not to mention I know when I need to be present for a meeting and when it will benefit me. I love companies that adopt this culture, flexible work schedules. On at 6am when I wake up, come in at 10, leave at 3, 4, 5,6, or go home and work more if I need to. I feel like we should think of offices like study halls, quiet, closed, engaging when needed. Leave the office gossip at home and slack. :)

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I have been hybrid / remote for more than a decade - these things help.

1. Separate computers - work and personal. Never check work email etc from the personal computer.
2. Dedicated space for working, not the kitchen table etc.
3. Use the settings on your phone to disable email alerts etc at the end of your work day.
4. Block you calendar pre/post work and only accept those meetings which are necessary.
5. Set hours IE 8-5 and block your lunch (or if you dine el desko - your exercise time) and enforce them. Inform your significant other of working hours so they can hold you accountable.
6. Rituals - start of day and end of day. For example I walk the dog right before I start work. I close my work laptop and disconnect it from external monitors, microphones etc at the end. It then is an actual decision to reengage because I have to connect everything again.

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It’s a difficult thing, but I try to have a consistent activity after work. For example, if you go to the gym, play video games, or play a sport consistently at 6pm then you have something splitting work from the rest of your day. I think of it as using what used to be my commute time to consistently do something I like.

likesmart

Pro tip: I dress up for remote work and change back after work. It creates a clear mental and physical divide for me between work and personal life.

likesmart

Pimp life is hard

likefunny

I go for a drive almost every day after work, as if I’m commuting… sometimes to the gym, sometimes to a coffee shop or a bar to meet a friend, sometimes I just drive and listen to NPR.

likesmart

Sounds like you don’t have kids 🤣

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I’ll come out and say it. I hate working from home (full time)! It’s almost like saying something dirty 🫢

likefunny

I like companies that allow choice to employees (so long as their role is appropriate for choices). For example, I used to work for a company with a job that I could 100% do from home (I enjoy working from home). But, my company wouldn't let me. They had a control problem.

So, I think the key here is to allow people choice. Also, I think hybrid is great because it gives people the best of both worlds.

I too enjoy spending time with my coworkers (my current employer has "zoom parties" lol and they are actually pretty fun a good way for me to spend time with the coworkers). But tbh, I reallllly like working from home The freedom of working in my PJ'S, not worrying about stupid and constant gossip/disturbing chatter, saving sooooo much time/money, not having to see my boss's face (jk! I love my boss...now my old boss...), and my attendance is perfect to a T. But, hey, that's just my preference. You have your own. Just depends on your personality, style of work, family life...etc.

But I reiterate the key here: choice.

I love to sit outside on my porch swing and drink a cup of tea, even in the middle of winter. It's how I start my day and (most of the time) how I end my work day. It's important to be able to separate work/home and dinner or whatever else you have to do can wait 20 min (or however long you want to take). Find a quiet place, listen to your audiobook still.

likesmarthelpful

If you have a home office, use that room/space solely as your work place. After you're done working, leave the room as if you were leaving your job. If you want to use time to decompress like your commute back home, go walk around your neighborhood, park, shopping complex, etc while listening to podcasts to simulate that decompression. Make sure you're not doing something like "because I'm not commuting home, I can work more to get more stuff done."

When your hours are done for the day, then go relax because it's now your time until the next day where you have to login and start work again.

likehelpful

I was about to write something very similar because that's what I usually do.

It's basically a matter to find out some strategy to get our minds disconnected from the work and relax.

And also, avoid checking emails, Slack, etc on your phone after you're done working. Working from home doesn't mean you're available 24/7. If a message pops up after your work hours, if it's not something very critical (in most cases it's something you can answer the next day), just skip it.

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Close the office door, go outside, smoke a bowl and listen to some music.

likehelpful

I'm looking to try to move to GitLab. How's the culture there?

I log off and go for a walk or head to the gym. It shifts my mindset and helps me unwind. I also keep my door closed to my office after hours so it’s “off limits” and just try to be cognizant to set boundaries.

likesmart

Yeah I love it, I start working earlier like 6 or 7 and I stop working a little earlier as well. I go to gym or I run an errand.

It helps to have a work laptop/set up and a personal computer set up. Moving to a different chair/area makes all the difference for me.

I am always checking my phone and reading emails briefly so I don't have too much trouble creating a work life balance. It might not be procrastination, but putting things off for later comes handy when it comes to stopping yourself from answering every email.

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I negotiated flex hours as well. I start at 5:00 am, have some breaks to deal with my kids, lunch, etc, and finish work at 3:00.

Best. Thing. Ever.

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Funny I was just walking out of the office with a colleague and we were marveling how nice it is that work psychologically ends when you walk out the door.

Go back to work?

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I wish that were the case but it seems I have never had a job where my work actually ended when I left the "office"

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When I first started working from home I had trouble with that transition so I would take a short drive, go to the store, etc. Before drive = work, after drive = home.

I also used to listen to audiobooks and podcasts when I was bus commuting and it's been a few years and still haven't fully figured that out. I miss my podcasts!

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As a grown man; I setup my old bedroom at my parents place as a home office because I needed to seperate work from home and I needed that commute to decompress. Now when I get home to my wife and kids I’m in a much better headspace than I was last year WFH. Less distractions at my parents too.

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I love taking bubble baths to unwind a few times per week after work. I do it up with eucalyptus salts and peppermint bath soap and wine when I’m not pregnant! I agree with others though - shut down and “leave” your workspace, take a walk outside, and listen to your audiobooks.

likesmart

Working out helps to separate the day from work and home

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Easy , once kids are back from school impossible to go back to work 😀.

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champagne 🤪🤪

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Go for a walk. It both helps shift my brain from work to not-work and meets physical needs. Bonus: physical activity helps complete the stress cycle which is extremely critical in our culture.

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As a husband and father, and my wife being a stay at home mom, it's unavoidable to go right from work upstairs in my office into full on dad mode. Wednesdays I have band practice though right after work, and I find that an activity in the middle of the week helps. But then on Tuesdays my wife does yoga at same time, so then it's swooping right into chasing a toddler.

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