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OH MY GOD THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR RECOGNISING THAT I POTENTIALLY HAVE THE SKILLS THAT YOU NEED TO MAKE MORE BUSINESS AND ALLOWING ME TO TRY AND CONVINCE YOU TO PAY ME FOR THEM

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This is dumb. The only insight this person has after 10 years is to pass on people who don’t send thank you notes 🙄🙄🙄

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likefunny
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This is an uncommon courtesy. I’d hate to see what other unhealthy and entitled expectations the author has in life. I’d hate to be her dry cleaner/mayor/exterminator

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Wait - did you read the article or just OP’s post?

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I hope none of you write thank you notes, so that I can take your jobs.

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Not sure how many people actually read this article and the follow up she posted as well, but not quite sure why everyone is so bent. All she said is it’s a good rule of thumb that a thank you is an indication of interest from the candidate (since you are interviewing each other for fit), and that it’s not a thank you note, but really an opportunity to communicate what you like about the role, why you are a good fit, etc. She has said she hires people that don’t, but on balance it’s a good additional data point that is action based. I don’t disagree. The idea you would “forget to write a thank you note” is perplexing to me.

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I wouldn’t pass on someone based solely on the absence of a thank you note, but it’s definitely something I pay attention to. Especially if I’m hiring for senior or ACD positions. At that point, your relationship-building skills become increasingly important in addition to your creative abilities.

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I’m actually surprised how many people are offended by this, especially in our industry. Forgetting that writing thank you notes is a common courtesy that goes back to the beginning days of job interviews, we work in a client service industry where you have to suck up and say thank you all the time whether it is warranted or not. As a hiring manager I would think that if you cannot do it for a job interview where it ultimately benefits you, will you do it in your client facing role when the stakes are less self serving and 1000xs more annoying? It’s just the name of the game and the way the corporate world works.

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A person who didn’t write thank you is probably not desperate and is in high demand. I would say, only hire people who do NOT say thank you and watch your fortunes rise because you’ll have a bunch of workers who don’t waste time on fluff.

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If it gets you a leg up, take 5 min and write the damn thank you note

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Ask a manager had a great response to this: https://www.askamanager.org/2019/04/rejecting-anyone-who-doesnt-send-a-thank-you-note-is-terrible-hiring.html “A hiring manager who rejects an otherwise strong candidate solely because they didn’t send a thank-you note is a hiring manager who’s not clear on what the must-have qualities and skills are to excel in the role … and who subscribes to an increasingly outdated old-school way of hiring where employers think they hold all the cards, and candidates’ job is to kowtow to them. They don’t, and it isn’t. Moreover, rejecting anyone who doesn’t send a thank-you is going to keep you from hiring candidates who come from backgrounds where they didn’t learn that particular job search convention, which many, many people do not: like people from less advantaged backgrounds, or people from families where their parents weren’t office workers, or many immigrants (thank-you notes aren’t a thing in many other countries). That’s going to have a disparate impact by race and class, so if you care about diversity and equity in your hiring, this is a terrible, biased practice."

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likeuplifting
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I fired a recruiter years ago for having a similar rule. We missed out on someone really great because they did not send a thank you note. I asked my recruiter if they called everyone that we decide not to hire and they said no. I asked them why not and they did really have an answer. Thank you notes are cool but I’m not going to turn down some amazing talent because they did not send a thank you note even though already said thank you at the end of the interview.

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likesmart
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I have the same rule as a manager. I only email the people I want to hire, though

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A thank you email is just common sense. It lets the hiring manager know you are still interested. If not, don’t send one. Duh!

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likesmart
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This sounds like the person interviewing wants the person hiring to thank every person they interview.

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If you expect a thank you email from every person you interview then please have the decency to respond to them. Personally, I’m more than satisfied with an in person thank you at the end of the interview.

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Honestly I expect a note saying thankyou just the same. Esp if THEY reached out to me cold

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Or when creatives hound you for a freelance job, and don’t thank you when you hook them up with one.

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Another reason to hate LinkedIn.

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The article feels a bit tone deaf, since the premise is that the presence or lack of a “thank you” note is the deciding factor. It’s also filled with anecdotal accounts that those who don’t send “thank you” notes will ghost prior to or a few months into the job. There are some deeper factors at play that are omitted because the article author feels there’s a correlation between staying with a job long term and sending a “thank you” note post-interview. What’s being discussed during the interview that a candidate’s interest in the role cannot be determined? What about the day-to-day life on this team might be affecting this observed turnover? That said, I hear the merits of both the author of the article (we all need a system for hiring that works for us), and I hear OP (there’s a lack of understanding that candidates are taking a risk and potentially losing out on income just to interview).

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I’ve known how to read for 28 years and swear by a simple rule: if your headline is more than 20 words, the rest of your editorial is likely garbage.

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It’s about as insightful as not hiring a person based on their astrological sign.

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Am I up shits creak if it took me 2 work days and a weekend to send a thank you? The CEO’s email was not made available (their site is under construction) and the HR person did not respond to my request for email address

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Nope, it’s fine. I hate weekend emails anyway.

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